Where Logic Meets Love

Spreading the Good News about Natural Family Planning

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Pin It Now!
Spreading the Good News about Natural Family Planning | Faith Permeating Life

Question: Why don't more people know about Natural Family Planning?

And of those who know about it, why don't more people use it?

I think there are a lot of possible answers to those questions. I'll touch on a few, but I think there's one large reason that no one is talking about.

Many doctors don't trust it or recommend it because they've seen too many couples unable to successfully avoid pregnancy when they wanted to. It doesn't matter that the couples weren't practicing it correctly -- easier to throw out the whole method than try to get people to do it right. (I could write a whole post on an angry conversation I had with a doctor about this.)

Without many doctors talking about it, it doesn't get incorporated into public school sex ed curriculum, which is where many people find out about their options for avoiding pregnancy -- and since we're teaching teenagers, we generally only teach them how to avoid pregnancy, not how to get pregnant, which NFP can also help with.

And if people never encounter NFP, or at least not until well into their adult life when they have a regular birth control routine established, then they're probably not going to provide information to their own kids about it.

Now, I'm mainly talking about non-Catholics here. A Catholic kid growing up is far more likely to encounter NFP at some point, either from their parents or Catholic school. I first found out about it while reading my mom's Catholic Digest in high school, and then I went off to a Catholic university where all the kids who had gone to Catholic high schools could fill me in on the details. That's not to say all Catholics know about it, but that the knowledge is largely contained within the Catholic community.

What I've been thinking about is why the practice of NFP hasn't spread out farther from Catholic circles. I know a lot of Catholics who would tell me that it's because non-Catholics are part of a "culture of death" (I sincerely hate that phrase) that accepts birth control and abortion as normal. But I don't think it's that simple. There are plenty of women who don't want to be on the Pill, either because they embrace a more "natural" lifestyle generally or because it has horrible side effects for them, but who want a way of preventing pregnancy that is more reliable than barrier methods.

And this is where I think the disconnect happens. Why hasn't NFP spread to more non-Catholics? Because the Catholics who are most vocal about it don't want to promote it as just another way to prevent pregnancy.

I started thinking about this after reading Jen Fulwiler's post about an article on NFP that, to her way of thinking, completely missed the point about NFP because the writer saw it through a "contraceptive worldview."

Now, if you ascribe to the Catholic Church's view of NFP (and therefore, their views about sex and contraception generally), everything Jen wrote makes a lot of sense. NFP isn't just another method for avoiding pregnancy, it's an entirely different philosophy about sex and childbearing than what the modern world teaches.

Except that it is. It is a method for avoiding pregnancy. It can be connected to Catholic philosophies and beliefs about God's intentions for our bodies. But the literal practice of charting your fertility does not require adhering to those beliefs.

However, in my experience, the vast majority of people teaching / publicly talking about NFP believe that it does. And that, I think, is one very large reason it hasn't spread.

Some would consider me heretical -- or, more nicely, misguided -- for teaching people about NFP without ever mentioning, or at least not going into great detail about, the entire Catholic philosophy behind it. Because theoretically, they are inseparable. But practically, they're not.

This is what I would call the "all in" fallacy. I talked about this in my post on the problem with labels, referencing the strange notion that it's somehow better to be a straight-up carnivore than being a semi-vegetarian who eats meat occasionally. Is it really somehow better to have someone continue to use artificial contraception than to persuade them to try NFP even if they don't ascribe to the entire philosophy behind it?

Note that I don't personally believe artificial contraception is evil, so I'm not saying we need to get everyone to stop using it any way we can. What I'm saying is that I think there are a lot of great things about NFP, and I believe more people should be introduced to it, in such a way that they're most likely to believe it is a reasonable possibility for them. When it's introduced as inseparable from Catholic teaching about the proper use of NFP, then I think that is more likely to turn people off who aren't ready to completely revolutionize their mindset about sex and openness to children.

And who knows? Maybe practicing NFP and thus becoming more aware of and connected with one's own bodily cycles, and necessarily communicating with one's spouse about one's current fertility level, would actually lead more people to shift their thoughts about sex, marriage, and children. Maybe if Catholics stopped trying to first convince people about the importance of the Theology of the Body in order to introduce Natural Family Planning, and instead focused on sharing the practical benefits of NFP, they'd end up shifting more people's beliefs in the end.

Having said all this, I want to introduce one potential caveat and then see what you think.

Natural Family Planning is difficult. There's no doubt that it requires some level of sacrifice if you are used to having intercourse whenever you feel like it. Whenever I talk to people about it, I caution them that they would potentially have to broaden their mind about what constitutes sex, and recognize that intercourse is just one way to be intimate with their partner. (Here I have already strayed from Catholic teaching.)

Here's the issue: NFP works extremely well at avoiding pregnancy if you don't have intercourse when you're fertile. And the question is whether a couple is prepared to deal with those moments when they are fertile and have a strong desire for intercourse. What I see in some Catholic circles is that people rarely want to admit that they failed at practicing NFP correctly because they got too horny; instead, they write it off as "God's calling" and see their child as an uequivocal blessing. I would imagine this is a lot easier to do when you are entrenched in Catholic teaching.

So from that perspective, I can see that there might be a fear that divorcing NFP from its Catholic philosophy would potentially lead to more abortions as a result of these "oops"/horny moments. But that idea chooses to ignore the fact that, in the absence of NFP, this same couple would most likely be using some form of artificial birth control and could also have an unintended pregnancy as a result of a broken condom or failed Pill. The difference with NFP is that the couple has definitively made a choice to open themselves to the possibility of pregnancy by having intercourse during a fertile period, and I would have to imagine that that has some positive effect on how that couple reacts to the pregnancy compared to "we did everything we could to prevent this!"

OK, I've talked enough. I want to know what you think. I'm already aware that my viewpoint is not the viewpoint of the Catholic Church, so you don't need to waste any time informing me of that.

Can and should Natural Family Planning be taught independent of the Catholic philosophy behind it? What would you say are the pros and cons of such an approach?

32 comments:

  1. Thanks for talking about this topic. And honestly, I don't feel like one major religion should have a monopoly on something that encourages health and conscious family planning decisions for couples. I don't think it has to stay married to the Catholic theology at all---it can be mentioned, certainly, and if the listener is interested in pursuing more of that background, then that is a spiritual decision for them that I can't make for them. But for all practical uses, I should be able to utilize NFP as a non-Catholic and not have that diminish the standing of my own personal beliefs.

    I also think it's just a good way to learn about our bodies! That's another thing that pills and condoms don't allow us to do-I'm all for these contraception methods, but a lot of younger women are coming out of their schooling thinking that their only option is to get on birth control, which may or may be something they can afford or want (since I do know a lot of ladies who get sick from it). Immediately going on the pill because it "seems like the only option" available to women takes away the unique process of trying something like NFP, which teaches us about our cycles and how to understand the ways our bodies naturally work to reproduce. And if resisting those "oops" urges is really so difficult... then a backup method could certainly be used. But I think educating our girls about their bodies sooner is ALWAYS a win, since too many teens are acting on their hormones and winding up pregnant and not understanding how it happened in the first place. Great topic!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I completely agree that NFP/Fertility Awareness Method should be taught in schools -- I wrote about this in my post on how I would design sex ed. So many women I talk to literally don't know that there's any other reliable method of avoiding pregnancy besides hormonal birth control. I think if more girls had the ability to understand their body's cycles this way before becoming sexually active, it would have a huge effect on how many decided to introduce hormonal birth control into their bodies, even if the Catholic philosophy/morality aspect of it was never mentioned.

      Delete
  2. I couldn't agree more. When I started using NFP I was using it because I am Catholic but begrudgingly so. But actually using it is what has changed my viewpoint on it. I think a lot of people could come to appreciate it too if it were just taught to them in a way that was practical for them (health reasons, complications with the pill, being green, etc.) In fact I just wrote about this (in response to all the backlash from that WaPo article.) Here's another post you may like that has these themes by my friend Sarah! :)

    http://fumblingtowardgrace.com/2012/04/19/catholic-birth-control/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You both had great posts on this! Thanks for sharing!

      I don't think Mike and I would have starting using NFP if the only reason to do so was "the Catholic Church says so." And unfortunately I think there are a lot of Catholics who think that the only reason to use NFP is because they're "supposed to," not that there are any actual benefits associated with it. For people who don't feel compelled to follow every letter of Catholic teaching (which I would argue is most Catholics... but that's a different conversation), I think we need to be much louder about all the benefits of practicing NFP than about how it makes you in line with Catholic teaching on birth control.

      Delete
  3. Admittedly, until recently, I've felt that NFP was very much a Catholic thing. Every time I can think of that I was exposed to the concept, it was hand in hand with Catholic doctrine. Not being Catholic, I listened respectfully, but couldn't quite get behind it. It seemed like a lot of work when I could take care of birth control with much easier means.

    I really didn't think about it again until I was forced to become aware of my body. Figuring out the signals my body was giving me became a lot easier when I started using the NFP method. I now have a system at my disposal that inherently gives me a plethora of information to take to the doctor. I can give very detailed information as opposed to guesses and estimates. I think both my doctor and I can agree that this is helping us along.

    Not being sexually active, however, gives me some wiggle room as well. Since I am not having sex,nailing down my fertility window isn't as big of a deal as I imagine it would be for a woman who is sexually active. I have some time play with the method, if you will, before deciding if I want to use it with my partner.

    Long story short, I agree that is definitely worth exposing young people to independent of the Catholic doctrine. It might not be their cup of tea as far as birth control goes, but it is a good source of information. Ignorance and sex are a horrible combination, so the more people have to work with, the better off they are going to be in the end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It seemed like a lot of work when I could take care of birth control with much easier means.
      Yes, this is exactly what I was saying to Katie above -- I feel like too many people (Catholic and non) see NFP as the Catholic Church's "convoluted" response to not allowing hormonal birth control, when it is introduced as one piece of a larger Catholic philosophy. I know I definitely saw it that way when I first heard about it. But when you separate it from Catholic doctrine, then all the benefits take the foreground and people are less likely to hear it as "this is what Catholics do because they're supposed to."

      Ignorance and sex are a horrible combination, so the more people have to work with, the better off they are going to be in the end.
      Agreed. This is why I advocate teaching all the options -- teaching NFP but being honest about its difficulties, teaching the Pill and being honest about its potential side effects, etc. Let people decide with their full range of options in front of them.

      Delete
  4. I will be honest I have not finished reading your article, I will but this popped in my head while I was reading and well, If I don't say something now I will forget about it.

    I am an NFP teacher. We work with CCLI.org and we have been teaching for about 12 years. One of the things that we have noticed is the number of non Catholics that have been coming to our classes. The number has been going up. In fact the last class we taught was all non-Catholics. Granted it was one couple but usually one or the other of them is Catholic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really interesting! I would guess that more and more information is getting out to non-Catholics via the Internet -- there are probably a lot more hits now than there used to be for a frustrated woman typing something into Google about alternatives to the Pill. That's one reason I write about it :)

      Delete
    2. I'm not Catholic, and after being on hormonal birth control since I was a teenager, I'm very seriously looking into beginning NFP. Just the idea of putting unnecessary chemicals (chemicals that are known carcinogens, even) into my body doesn't seem healthy to me. I've had friends who have had terrible side effects, and while I haven't had any issues with my BC, I don't like taking medicine for something I don't need to. I would love more information, but one of the reasons my husband and I haven't started NFP yet is that the classes are expensive and far away, and through insurance, my BC is free.

      Delete
    3. I don't think it necessary to take a class to begin practicing NFP. I recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility for an overview of how NFP/FAM works, but the charting method I use comes from The Art of Natural Family Planning Student Guide, which you can order from Amazon or wherever. It's a workbook intended to go with the NFP class through CCLI, but I don't think you need the class in order to use it. It walks you through the charting method and has practice charts to try it out on. Those two books together should be able to get you started and answer most of your questions. And you're welcome to send me questions anytime!

      Delete
  5. I think there is a compromise to be had here. I mean to me the Catholic teaching are very important, but given what NFP has given me in the last 12 years I can honestly say that I would do it even if it were not for the Catholic teachings.

    To me as a husband and father, NFP is as much about respect and marriage as it is about "birth control." I could go on and on about respecting the whole person, but I won't I will just say that respecting the whole person it central to a healthy marriage. And NFP gives a couple a level of intimacy without sex that might not be able to gain without it. What am I talking about. If you are (and again from a husband's point of view) aware on a day to day basis what of your wife's body is doing, you know more than most people, and that brings you closer together.

    Waiting sucks. But let's be honest with each other, so does having to go to work on Monday morning but you do that every week. But in a culture of now, now, now, suggesting that someone wait is like asking them to pull their own fingernails out. Having to wait for something like sexual intimacy with my wife has taught me at least a level of control in waiting for other things as well, and couldn't our culture use a little of that?

    So to answer your question, yes it should be taught outside of Catholic circles. Can you teach the method without the religious implications? Sure. But there is a level of moral obligation that is required for NFP to work, and that while it can be taught without it, NFP fits very well within the teachings of the church, so teaching it without that does not make total sense.

    There is a lot to think about here, and obviously I don't have all the answers. Thanks for the great thought provoking post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your thoughtful and open-minded response. I agree that there are many, many benefits to practicing NFP in terms of respect for one's body and one's partner, expanded forms of intimacy, patience, and more. It seems like there is maybe a leap of logic going on here, though: that is, NFP fits well within the Church's teachings, therefore it needs to be taught alongside those teachings. You could just as easily, I think, draw a different conclusion: therefore, teaching NFP without the religious teachings surrounding it will naturally lead people to come to understand and appreciate those religious teachings anyway.

      I also have an issue with equating "the culture" and "every individual non-Catholic." I'm not sure if this is what you were specifically saying, but this is something I've seen over and over again in discussion of NFP (and other issues), that because "our culture" is one of immediate gratification, individual satisfaction, etc., that it would be somehow impossible for any given individual to have the patience needed for NFP unless they had the Catholic teaching to "fortify" them in some way. And I just don't think that's true. I think a couple who had a very strong desire to avoid hormonal birth control for health reasons but wanted to avoid a pregnancy could very well be willing to wait during the fertile periods, regardless of their religion and regardless of what the outside culture is like. And like you said, learning to wait in this area may help people learn patience in other areas as well.

      Delete
    2. But there is a level of moral obligation that is required for NFP to work

      Please elaborate. As a non-Catholic who's practiced NFP for years, I have no idea what you mean.

      Delete
  6. This, to me, is similar to people who think Christians can't practice yoga. Because yoga, in some parts of the world, many years ago, was tied very closely with religious practices, some Modern American Christians think we cannot exercise our muscles this way without being heretics.

    Same with NFP, it seems. Because it's been tied into a religious practice at some point, Modern American Christians think it must ALWAYS be tied to that particular religion.

    Which is weird. Because most Modern American Christians (I'm going to refer to us as MACs from now on) have the Easter Bunny and Santa in their lives. Pagans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's interesting -- I feel like I came at this topic from the Catholic perspective, trying to convince Catholics that NFP doesn't need to stay married to Catholic doctrine, but trying to convince non-Catholics that NFP isn't just a Catholic thing is the flip side of the same coin. The more that Catholics insist that NFP is inextricably linked to Catholic teaching, the less that non-Catholics are going to see it as something that could become separate from that religion.

      Delete
    2. It really is the flip side of the same coin, as you said.

      And I think that's a testament to your writing: You write from a Catholic perspective, trying to speak through that paradigm, but others can see the application for them, as well.

      Delete
    3. Thanks! That's always my hope, that although I can only speak from my own perspective, other people will be able to see possible applications for their own lives.

      Delete
  7. I have used NFP as a non-catholic for several years now and I do think it's something everybody should know about. (I was coming out of the quiverfull/have as many kids as possible movement, so it was a middle step, but also I prefer natural approaches when possible.) I will definitely teach my daughters about it when they reach puberty--it just gives so much more understanding of the body. I did have an ob/gyn who supported it as well, though he was unusual in many regards. We are moving to sterilization now because, yes, it can be challenging and we are sure we are done, but I am very glad we were able to use it. I used the big CCLI manual and figured it out on my own, but I've heard a lot of people recommend *Taking Charge of Your Fertility* by Toni Weschler for a non-Catholic take on it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I need to read Taking Charge of Your Fertility -- I've heard many people recommend it as well, and so my advice to non-Catholics who want to learn more is usually something along the lines of, "I really like The Art of Natural Family Planning for its practical examples and explanations... but you may want to skip over all the parts lecturing you about the proper Catholic way to practice NFP... and then I've also heard good things about a book called Taking Charge of Your Fertility but I haven't actually read it."

      After I had an unfortunate GYN experience, I switched to a midwives association that is openly supportive of NFP. I think it's very important to have your doctor on your side when it comes to something like this -- if you have to defend the effectiveness of your chosen family planning approach, you'll get at best a begrudging blessing to continue, but no support in interpreting your charts or getting questions answered.

      Delete
  8. As a non-Catholic, when our friends started discussing it, I thought it was some kind of hippy, new age nonsense. But it has a lot of benefits for health and, yes, even communication. Thanks for a great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! And yes, I try to emphasize the benefits as much as possible so people understand why we love it so much!

      Delete
  9. I found out about NFP/FAM because I belonged to a message board that had a lot of women who were trying to conceive. It ended up being a godsend because I was having issues with being on hormonal birth control (they made me feel like I had a urinary tract infection constantly and I'd test negative for them... when I stopped the HBC, I stopped having the problem). Charting really helped me get to know my body. I use http://kindara.com/ to maintain my chart (I've got 5 invites in case anyone wants one), and have used http://fertilityfriend.com/ in the past too. I'd recommend either.

    I'd definitely second the recommendation of "Taking Charge of Your Fertility" by Toni Weschler. I sort of consider it "the manual" of how the female reproductive system works, it's a great reference book to have around. In TCOYF, the term that she uses for NFP is FAM, Fertility Awareness Method. From what I understand, NFP and FAM are pretty much the same in terms of data collected, the difference is in how you decide to handle that fertile period if you're trying to avoid. In NFP, you'd abstain and in FAM you'd have the choice between using a barrier method or abstaining.

    I remember after I read the book, I want through a phase where I was lividly angry because I felt like I'd been totally duped by not being taught this information about my body when I was younger. I felt like it was a massive amount of critical information that someone should have at least mentioned somewhere along the line.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's awesome that you found FAM so beneficial for your health. I find myself most often talking about NFP with friends who having unwanted side effects from their hormonal birth control, although it can be difficult to convince them that the time needed to learn NFP is worth it if they're regularly sexually active already (most are married).

      I felt that same way you describe when I first learned about the DivaCup -- why didn't anyone tell about me this before???

      Delete
  10. NFP was always mentioned at the bottom of the lists of 'contraception' or 'ways not to get pregnant' in Sex Education at school, as a 'last resort', or the most fallible option. It was never referred to as Catholic or religious, but it did seem to be discouraged - not just for your teenage years, but for your whole life!
    We use condoms ourselves - my doctor has repeatedly tried to get me to go on the Pill, because it has a higher success rate, allegedly... Condoms only don't statistically because sometimes people forget to use them/don't use them properly! Yes, occasionally splits do occur as well, but we're willing to take that risk - so far, so good! I have to take daily medication as it is, (one which could cause potential problems with the Pill anyway), and I'm sometimes bad at remembering to take that, let alone something for contraception.
    I've learnt a lot more about NFP from your blog, and it definitely appeals. We're in the process of deciding where we are with planning for a family, and we are definitely considering changing to NFP as condoms do have their disadvantages. I do have already have a good understanding of my cycle, which will definitely help to make the change, but I like the idea of it creating more intimacy, and being in a better place to plan for a baby in the future.
    Thanks for sharing all about it - I appreciate getting info from someone with practical experience, rather than from some patronising leaflet from the doctors!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Argh! What a huge block of text! Why didn't my paragraphs work? :'(

      Delete
    2. I'm so glad to hear that you've found the information here useful! I try to make the information as practical as possible because, again, I don't feel like trying to convince someone that condoms are evil is going to be an effective strategy to get them to adopt NFP. The benefits of NFP, though, are a big selling point, I think.

      If you have any questions about NFP as you look into it as an option, please feel free to e-mail me! I'm very open about answering any questions :)

      Delete
  11. The distinction I've often seen is that NFP refers to the Catholic methods/philosophy, while Fertility Awareness Method refers to the secular version. The mothering.com discussion boards are one place to find a lot of people who use FAM because it's more natural than contraceptives and who will recommend it for investigating any quirk of cycles and for trying to conceive, as well.

    I agree completely that FAM needs better publicity. The fact that it's not a prescription drug or a product that gets used every time you have sex means there isn't much to sell and thus not much advertising budget!

    Another thing that works against FAM/NFP in the eyes of young people not ready to become parents, and people who want just a few kids, is that many of the people who most loudly advocate NFP have large numbers of closely-spaced children. It may well be that that's exactly the kind of family they wanted--but someone who doesn't want that isn't likely to be attracted to the same method they used! Furthermore, some of them (Jennifer Fulwiler, for example) make frequent comments about how they're "bad at NFP." Their intent may be to convey that NFP on average works better than it has worked for them because they're not doing it well--but to a lot of people I bet it conveys that NFP is difficult to do well (I mean, Jennifer is obviously extremely intelligent, so if *she* can't get it right...) and serves as a reminder that NFP keeps you constantly one slip-up away from having an unwanted child. It's interesting how rarely you see anyone who uses artificial contraception advocating the use of their particular contraceptive method while commenting offhandedly that their 3rd and 5th children exist only because they're "bad at using the diaphragm" or whatever.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I chose not to go into the whole thing about FAM and whether it's different or whether NFP minus Catholic teaching equals FAM. Or, as this blogger put it, FAM = "NFP + condoms + contraceptive worldview." Which I think is a bit misleading... but anyway. I basically use the two terms interchangeably to mean "a method of tracking one's fertility."

      I agree about the publicity/advertising, and this is partly why I wanted to write about this. I've seen discussions elsewhere about FAM/NFP and how, if you don't want a Catholic-oriented class, you're often out of luck for being taught by anything other than a book. And so while on the one hand, I understand why an organization like the Couple-to-Couple League feels they have to teach Catholic doctrine along with the techniques of charting, I think they're dissuading some people from trying NFP/FAM as a result. I guess someone needs to start a non-religiously affiliated non-profit organization to teach FAM -- easier said than done :)

      You make a really good point about how people joke about NFP but not so much about other forms of birth control, and that can give the impression that it's less effective. I mean, I know someone who tried increasingly serious forms of birth control with each child (condom - broke, Pill - failed) up to having a hysterectomy and she STILL got pregnant, but I've never heard her make any joking comments about her children only existing because of her birth control failure. I would guess this difference is because joking about NFP is more of self-deprecating humor about a semi-positive aspect of oneself ("We just couldn't help ourselves!") whereas joking about other forms of birth control would be almost like insulting your own sexual abilities ("I suck at putting condoms on correctly"), which at least in American culture is generally avoided. But I do think that those "bad at NFP" jokes aren't helping the cause (if the cause is getting more people to try NFP) :)

      Delete
    2. OK, Wikipedia tells me that there are some secular organizations teaching fertility awareness, but it's "citation needed" so I have no idea what they are :)

      Delete
  12. I think getting the word out about NFP is a good thing.. whether you are religous or not. You can prevent or acheive pregnancy with the knowledge that NFP brings, no matter what your personal beliefs are. I'm finding a lot of people online that use NFP and are not Catholic. I get frustrated with my OBGYN, he is constantly pushing contraceptives. I told him I was using "NFP" and both him and his nurse looked at me and said, "What?" (I honestly don't think they knew what it stood for, if that is even possible.) So I said, "Well, I just choose to use natural methods." Then 5 minutes later (he was filling out a checklist on his computer screen, and obviously had to put something in for contraceptive... and NFP wasn't one of the checkboxes... So he looks at me and says "Uh... for contraceptives... I am going to select barrier method.") At that point I was getting frustrated and didn't want to say, "Just select None..." but I also didn't want to begin a medical discussion with him educating him on why NFP can be effectively used to avoid pregnancy. They should be teaching this in medical school. I can understand why Catholic theology would turn off someone who is not interested in Catholic teaching... You've got to meet people where they are and they can benefit in many ways from NFP, so it's good to be talking about it, in my oppinion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so frustrating! I had a similar experience with my OBGYN, which led me to switch to getting my well-woman exams at a midwives' association after confirming that they knew about and understood NFP. It's amazing to me how many doctors have 1) never heard of NFP/FAM, 2) think it's the same as the Rhythm Method, or 3) assume it's completely ineffective.

      Delete
  13. "What I see in some Catholic circles is that people rarely want to admit that they failed at practicing NFP correctly because they got too horny; instead, they write it off as "God's calling" and see their child as an uequivocal blessing."

    Stands and applauds.

    ReplyDelete

Your thoughts matter, so join in the conversation! Disagreements are welcome, but please stay respectful and open-minded with your comments.

I reply to almost all comments, so check back here soon!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...